Restaurant Ramble

Last week I went on the Restaurant Ramble, organised by Kirsty of Ethical Eats at Sustain in conjunction with the Sustainable Restaurant Association.

Full disclosure: as you probably know I work at Sustain on the Real Bread Campaign so I’m not even going to attempt to be impartial.

Basically, the idea of the night was to have a progressive dinner at four different members of the Sustainable Restaurant Association. Kirsty’s already blogged the event so I’m just going to nick her description:

Ramblers met at the Duke of Cambridge Organic Pub, for an aperitif of crostini including Home Smoked Trout with Horseradish and Marinated Baked Ricotta with Mint and Tapenade accompanied by Organic Sloe Gin with Lemonade. Guests then followed the leader to walk 500 meters to The Charles Lamb. We enjoyed a starter of Chegworth Valley Apple Tarte-tatin with Black Pudding or Blue Cheese served with garden fresh leaves perfectly matched with Furrow Hill Somerset Cider.

We were then whisked away by London Pedicabs to The Clerkenwell Kitchen. We were presented with a “gorgeous” Fish Stew with Ailoi or Aubergine & Tarragon Gratin with Berkswell Cheese served with perky, peppery watercress and sour dough flutes all washed down with the delightful Chapel Down Flint white wine. Finally, a short stroll to Bistrot Bruno Loubet at The Zetter Hotel for an “amazing” Blackberry and Apple Charlotte followed by the Harvest Chase – a cocktail of Chase Marmalade Vodka, Fresh Pear & Lemon with Rose Hip Foam.

The Chapel Down was a revelation to me – I have slightly bad memories of Chapel Down that come from leading a tour group there during the Great Career Crisis of 2009. I didn’t like any of the wines except the English Rose bubbly, which in itself was surprising since I’m not a huge fan of bubbly. But the Flint Dry was delicious.

041
Canapés at the Duke of Cambridge

042
Tarte Tatin at the Charles Lamb. This is a wonderful old locals pub that’s been gentrified without losing its charm.

045
Playing tourist on a rather hair-raising pedicab ride.

048
Blackboard menu at the Clerkenwell Kitchen

054

055

057
Watercress!

059
Interesting lamps at Bruno Loubet

062
The Charlotte really was tasty.

Thanks Kirsty and all the restaurants for a great evening, I’m already looking forward to the next one!

Advertisements

7 thoughts on “Restaurant Ramble

  1. This looks like a fun evening. I really like English bubbly – it was the same with Camel Valley wines, but a recent white is pretty damn good, which was a bit of a revelation. Vinoteca stock it.

    All the above look great, Clerkenwell Kitchen is a particular favourite of mine, and the fish stew does look typically tasty. Perfect lunch sized portion there too (with bread)

    • I went to Chapel Down around March last year, so we were sampling the 2007 vintage and there were a couple of pretty awful Pinot Noirs – which they seemed to acknowledge by telling us they would taste a lot better with age! 2007 was such a horrible summer I’m surprised they managed to produce any wine at all. But the Flint Dry really was good.

      I’m still going to stuff my suitcase with wine the next time I go to NZ.

  2. Nice one! Glad you had a good time and some yummy ethical food. Good news that you’re a convert to the Chapel Down wines too.

    Thanks for coming and blogging. The pics are great!

    for those who want to come next time, follow us on twitter.com/ethicaleats or join the Friends of http://www.thesra.org

    • I bought a bottle of it this evening (from the People’s Supermarket, there’s an unwritten blog post), and have just drunk most of it, and it’s all your fault.

  3. So that’s what their called: pedicabs! I was wondering about exactly this, when I visited London for 3 weeks in the summer. I know they’re called ‘rickshaws’ in Asia but somehow I couldn’t see that name fitting in with London traffic lights and our cloudy weather 🙂 because to be called a ‘rickshaw’ the vehicle would have to be so much brighter and painted with patterns, prayers, messages and the like.
    I just wonder: was it a comfortable ride for you? and was there anything to protect you if it rained, like the tarpaulin sheet every rickshaw driver carries?
    Certainly looks like a lot of fun!

    • Hi! Finally getting to the depths of my inbox… No, definitely not a comfortable ride! The drivers were racing each other and it got rather hair-raising! It was a warm evening though so it wasn’t cold. The ones I’ve ridden in in Asia were all motored but by law here they have to be completely unpowered (or rather, cycle powered). Some drivers got into trouble last year for using motors!

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s